S T A N F O R D M E D I C I N E

Volume 18 Number 2 Fall 2001


index

Assessing radioimmunotherapy

Nationwide, Stanford is a leader in initiating clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy — a technique that uses a cancer-specific antibody coupled with a radioactive atom to fight cancers. Most patients who have been treated with radioimmunotherapy at Stanford suffered from non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma. Currently, however, Stanford physicians are also involved in clinical trials for patients with leukemia and prostate, colorectal and pancreatic cancers, as well as soft tissue sarcomas.

In addition to tackling different types of cancer, physicians are also assessing when in the course of the disease to employ radioimmunotherapy. In the first round of trials on non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients, the treatment was used only when conventional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation had failed. Now trials are under way to determine if radioimmunotherapy treatment also works well when used as a front-line treatment for the disease. Preliminary results are promising.

Stanford physicians who have been involved in researching and testing radioimmunotherapy include J. Augusto Bastidas, MD, assistant professor of surgery; Karl Blume, MD, professor of medicine; Steve Coutre, MD, assistant professor of medicine; George Fisher, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine; James Ford, MD, assistant professor of medicine; Michael Goris, MD, PhD, professor of radiology; Sandra Horning, MD, professor of medicine; Susan Knox, MD, PhD, associate professor of radiation oncology; Ron Levy, MD, professor of medicine; and Robert Negrin, MD, associate professor of medicine.

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